Bailin Studio

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2017,
2020–22

Ghosts

During the Covid Pandemic, I relocated across the country. When I drew I drew in my small sketchbook and focused, appropriately, on images of floods, fires, and loss.

— David Bailin • 2021

Ghosts 2017, 2020 – 2021

  •  ERUPTION• 2021 • Charcoal on Canvas • 55 x 55 inches [140 x 140 cm]

    ERUPTION• 2021 • Charcoal on Canvas • 55 x 55 inches [140 x 140 cm]

  •  EXPLOSION• 2021 • Charcoal on Canvas • 55 x 55 inches [140 x 140 cm]

    EXPLOSION• 2021 • Charcoal on Canvas • 55 x 55 inches [140 x 140 cm]

  •  SNAPSHOT• 2021 • Charcoal on Paper • 55 x 55 inches [140 x 140 cm]

    SNAPSHOT• 2021 • Charcoal on Paper • 55 x 55 inches [140 x 140 cm]

  •  DOUBLE EXPOSURE• 2020 • Charcoal and Ink on Paper • 48 x 55 inches [122 x 140 cm]

    DOUBLE EXPOSURE• 2020 • Charcoal and Ink on Paper • 48 x 55 inches [122 x 140 cm]

  •  RIVERBED• 2020 • Charcoal and Ink on Paper • 48 x 55 inches [122 x 140 cm]

    RIVERBED• 2020 • Charcoal and Ink on Paper • 48 x 55 inches [122 x 140 cm]

  •  A PASSAGE • 2020 • Ink on Paper • 18 x 24 inches [61 x 46 cm]

    A PASSAGE • 2020 • Ink on Paper • 18 x 24 inches [61 x 46 cm]


Sketchbook IV: Selections

All pages approximately 5½ x 3½ inches.
  •  Seas • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Seas • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Following • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Following • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Watch • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Watch • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Pivot • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Pivot • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Flag • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Flag • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Crouching • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Crouching • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Flood • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Flood • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Stagger • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Stagger • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Throw • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Throw • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Pointing • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Pointing • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Sprint • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Sprint • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Pacing • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Pacing • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Crossing • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Crossing • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Disagreement • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Disagreement • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Study with Dog • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Study with Dog • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Burning Book • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Burning Book • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Emerging • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Emerging • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Field • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Field • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Turrets • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Turrets • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Trail • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Trail • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Pointing There • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Pointing There • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Fleeing • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Fleeing • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Convey • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Convey • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Crowds • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Crowds • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Crowds • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Crowds • n/d • Ink on Paper

  •  Crowds • n/d •  Ink on Paper

    Crowds • n/d • Ink on Paper


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Statement

During the last couple of years, I have worked primarily in my sketchbook. When drawing thumbnails and sketches, there are no grand gestures, prickly technical issues or self-consciousness, no expectations or visual blowback from an unresponsive image. Sometimes an image is discovered on one of those pages that sparks a new idea or series of drawings. And sometimes the act of sketching is so calming and restful that I find myself falling asleep mid-gesture only to wake up finishing the line. In the interstices between sleep and awakening, an image will occur. Most of the time it is lost but occasionally it appears fully formed. The series, Ghosts, involve images I retained from those moments. There is no thematic or narrative consistency except that in each of the drawings, the selection of materials and technique is self-referential. In a drawing using charcoal that has been wiped and blown off the paper, a women stands in front of a broken tree that has fallen over a fence during a storm; ink drawn over charcoal creates a gritty, muddy surface for a drawing of a boat stuck in a dried up lake bed; dragging the side of a piece of charcoal across a gessoed canvas creates a powder of blurry images that depict people moving to or running away from some kind of disaster.

These drawings are interruptions that insert themselves into my artistic process and require a special consideration. A consideration not only of what is drawn but how it is drawn.

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